ENLARGE FOR MORE DETAIL
Human Design
The human form (in design) is the most vulnerable in its stability to remain astride - with two vertical legs joined together at the pelvic bone. Half of the body's weight rests on this point - designating this point (the hara region) the center of gravity. It is the point where two legs supporting from the ground converge. This, in any structure is easily attacked by applying pressure from the top and applying a twist to either direction (giving the legs a twisting rope effect). The pressure from the top is necessary to eliminate the chances of repositioning of one of the supporting legs (which at this case - you'll have to start over again).
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Point-of-Collapse
Placing your hands on the opponents shoulders (top), press down firmly so that your opponents feet are evenly firm on the ground. Then vigorously spin the subject - both legs will twist like a rope and buckle, and the person would surely fall and probably brake a knee in the process. This stage at which the knees are about to give is what I call the point-of-collapse (we will use this term often)....
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Aside from the shoulders, other holds are applied to protract the implementation of point-of-collapse. Equally effective, the head lock, wrist hold, hand, and finger hold can all initiate point-of-collapse. Initiating a spin on the finger hold, and a deliberate pull direct towards the ground, will render point-of-collapse. A hand or a wrist hold and a spin, always keeping the subject's arm straight, and a deliberate pull downward also cause point-of-collapse. A head hold with a twist and a deliberate pressure downward will evoke point-of-collapse.Technically, the twisting pressure applied transfers to the spine, and then to the hips, allowing the point-of-collapse to result. Again, a firm pressure to the ground must be implemented.
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Gravity-downward Assist
Once you have reached the point-of-collapse, initiate a take-down which I call Gravity-downward Assist. It's a direct pressure downward to collapse the opponents legs from underneath. This pressure, in essence, enhances the gravitational pressure - doubling the natural reactions to balance.
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Hold your opponent firmly, and lower your center of gravity (bend your knees). This will finalize your opponent's point-of-collapse into a fall, throw, or a take-down. Once you have applied the twist and Point-of-collapse is inevitable, initiate Gravity-downward assist with deliberate continuous pressure.
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Once the downward pressure is subjected, you can pull your opponent around simultaneously without him being able to move a leg (therefore, collapsing to the ground). This is leverage using gravitational assist.
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Center of Gravity
Always focus on the center of gravity. This is also called the hara region. You can stop a full running attack with a properly planted front kick at the center of gravity. To judge the distance of your opponent and to check your range, you focus on the center of gravity. It is easier to throw your opponent with a correct lift applied to your opponent's center of gravity. Most of judo techniques are to undermine the center of gravity of the opponent, then to instantly initiate a throw. The monkey roll is easily accomplished when you apply the lift correctly below the opponent's center of gravity. It's not how you grab his lapel and throw him over you, it's about holding about his collar - and slipping under him and nudging his center-of-gravity off the floor so that he would be thrown or rolled over you. From this point the elbow strike is waiting to be dispatched with proper target, brace-support, and execution - before the subject can implement proper friction to the ground to initiate a reaction.
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The Gate
...all viable attacks (punches, kicks and weapons) will have to go through the gate (Musashi, the book of five rings)....to correctly monitor your opponent, check and block at the gate area. Beyond this range you're extending your guard too far off. See: illustration. Never focus on your opponent's weapons, feet, hands or chest. If anything, focus at his center of gravity and you can judge if he's too close - then apply the gate methodology. When your enemy's in range, you try to snuff his plan - as soon as your opponent snaps at you, check/block at the gate - you will catch the attack there. Make your counter attack instantaneous. At this point-of-shock your opponent will try for a remedial strike, be ready to apply check/block at the gate and counterstrike as soon as he flinches. Deliver strikes at the pressure points....
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Point-of-Shock
What I call the point-of-shock is the space in time that you designate for your self by systematically applying a stimulus for your opponent to react upon. The point-of-shock is a moment in which your opponent is temporarily paralyzed, momentarily blinded, his guard going the wrong direction, or his mind just momentarily blanked-out. This is the time that you are applying your strike, when your opponent cannot do anything about it. ....Ki-ai can deliver a point-of-shock, at which your opponent's defense would be turned off for a fraction of a second - during which you can deliver a strike. This is one of the reasons why we're working with check/block method and not reactionary...under construction

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VIDEO 5-1
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VIDEO 5-2
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Power Strike
To understand the concept of the power-strike, one may simply think of merely pushing a full size vehicle (or a car) while wearing a pair of greasy flip-flops under your feet. This is where my physics comes in. It's almost impossible isn't it? Now, wearing a pair of non-skid shoes, your feet grips the ground, your legs evaluate the angle of attack, your spine and your arms calibrate a more linear expansion of force, and the car is moving. These are the same factors necessary for a power-strike (or a knock-out punch). Relying on your own speed and body mass alone is not sufficient especially if your opponent is heavier and faster than you are.
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The same principle applies when you are braced against a wall, with a part of your body in contact (a palm or a shoulder) to provide the inertia and vector of force.
One can learn this coordination through practice. The body must be in a relaxed state until the point of impact, when the hara region (center of gravity) or pelvic area, explodes with two vectors (one to the ground and another to the target).
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This principle can be applied in your blocking system. A block is a strike. In this way, you will be able to manage a combination of both power-strikes and power-blocks. Practice your forms with this in mind. It will not only make your forms look better, it will make it practical and esthetically well developed.
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In blocking, standing straight up and swinging your arms does not work. You have to brace them to the ground just like strikes. Block closer toward your elbows, I have stopped numerous full blown round-house kicks in this way.  With the weapon block close to the tsuba and flick the opponents sword the rest of the way and watch his sword fly off to the side.  The counter attack is easier.  While in the state of shock your opponent is helpless to react to your strike (he would be straining to catch-up at all times). They're often out-of-balance after a solid block. Counter with a feign strike (about the same time of your parry), then release a power-punch or a strike.
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White Crane Methodology (Empty Hand)
In the White Crane method, you will learn to establish excellent balance. The moves associated with this method consist of blocking and striking with two arms and blocking and kicking with a leg (alternately - which ever leg is most appropriate on a particular situation) all at one given moment.
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If an opponent attacks you with a left and a right hand simultaneously, he would be at a disadvantage at an instant because he would receive an incoming kick, this is the essence of the white crane method. The purpose of white crane is to multitask with your three limbs in all directions, effectively and accurately, while your opponent is accustomed to moving only two.
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The white crane method is also effective against multiple attackers. Again, you must apply feign first before an actual attack, this will make you more effective. Fake to one direction and strike at your target, you will connect more in this way.
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Sweep low at the legs and focus on lifting up your knee up high. This will give you a readily available block and quick front kick without too much effort. To practice white crane is to constantly have one knee up momentarily, readily available, and in timing of your strategy.
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The white crane method is also indicative of striking in mid-air. This is to deliver a counter strike without the support of the ground and its friction (it's not going to be a knock-out punch or kick). Its main purpose is to deter an impeding strike that would be taking advantage of the time that you are in a state-of-shock. This method strikes to the pressure points or soft-spots (eyes, groin, throat, ears, jaw-equilibrium, etc.).
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Shinko Matayoshi is known to be able to practice a well extended version of the White-Crane technique.  An all day assorted rendition of it was his past-time, including the monkey-style.

To train yourself on the white-crane punching system, is to have your partner set his hand as a target.  With quick strikes, he still should be able to dodge your punches.  However, with just a normal solid punch (by carefully eradicating your telegraphing flinches, re-chambers - you should be able to connect at will.  If you have attained this level, then you have arrived at the threshold of the white-crane philosophy.
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Check/Blocking System
In the strategy of check/block system, the type of incoming attack is irrelevant. Practically, from the top view - all vectors of attack is emanating from your attacker's center point (this would be the spine). Your attacker's feet would be in contact with the ground, transferring the ground's inertia through the hips, spine, shoulders, arms, and finally - fists. From the top view, the moment of impact is an almost a straight line from the ground contact, spine, fists, and the target. Kicks follow the same physical rule (ground, hip, and target).
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To disrupt this point of impact (the straight line connection), observing from the top view - to parry your opponent's attack effectively, a chamber for a counter strike doubling as a parry in continuous application is the secret ingredients of the check/blocking system. In this way, your opponent is always a step or two behind you.
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Hands up or hands down, blocking with your elbows - you are ready to dispatch a quick counter strike. with your knee up for a block - you are ready to dispatch a quick counter-kick. This is the system of the White Crane check/blocking technique.
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Feign and Strike Method
To feign or throw a fake-strike is to implement a ready position (chambered position) for your attack. In this way, your opponent is a step behind you. You do not need to re-chamber to dispatch your strike, it's already in position. This is used in all level of strategy.
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Methodically, a real attack is already in plan. This is why (in practice) we call the target's name out before you strike it and call it again at the time of the strike. There is no other school that does this. Throwing-in fake strikes or feigns is only preparing you to time a perfect delivery of the main strike (or strike forces).
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With practice, you will be able to implement multiple potential targets with multiple feigns and fake strikes - rendering your opponents like sitting ducks. You can throw-away those cute stances, they mean nothing to you. Stand-up and fight like a real man (as in human-form), with your body and spirit straight, and let your opponents get all twisted about.
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Kicking Method
In the white-crane system, the leg is utilized as thirty-three percent of potential parry and strike armament. As you are accustomed to the left and right hand alternation, the legs provide additional technical methodology.
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Methodically, a round-house kick is a centrifugal kick, with its force being guided by the radius of the kicking-leg. The forward and reverse spin of the centrifugal kick can be managed to overcome the defensive parries upon the centrifugal radius (the leg).
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The straight-kick is the implementation of a force to travel on a straight vector from launch to target. This is using a straight line, therefore it is quicker (much like a swing punch vs. a straight punch). The fundamental of the straight kick is to focus on bringing the knee up (elevated) for the purpose of parrying and maneuvering. From this elevation, the foot can be flicked quickly to strike any target (by: side-kick, front-kick, back-kick and even spinning kick). Harnessing a straight kick with a foot coming from the ground to a target, will involve more mechanical coordination between the ankle, knee, and hip-joints; and three points are harder to apply on straight vectors and can cause an injury. The fast flicking point from knee to the foot (towards the target), after the hip had elevated the knee to a desired position is the essence of the white-crane method. SEE CHARTS
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Goju Shiho Method
The Goju-shiho method, suppresses the opponent effectively with the techniques of simultaneous punch and front kick. With the palms facing up, your fingers are safe from quick front kick from your opponent (your fingers wont brake), hence you are able to close the distance and neutralize your opponent.
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It has a stepping method for closed-in combat maneuver and low center of gravity to be able to use in take-down applications and to defend against throws.
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Pasai Method
The Pasai method implements effective steps in preparations for an assortment of spins, parries and counter strikes. Power blocks with prechambered counter punches and spinning turns with prechambered counter kicks are implemented.
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I have recognized the potential of this method early and have successfully adapted it for a knife technique (tanto). The figure-eight hand movements and supported blocks were perfectly adaptable with all weapons.
The footwork of Pasai Katas provide a strong and well levered stances adaptable for use in managing pole-arms.
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Kusanku Method
The Kusanku is the most dynamCheck Spellingic method implementing all movements including low and high attacks (low sweep, jump kick, take-downs, double-blocks, double-punch, simultaneous kick and punch, and attacks to the pressure-points). Kusanku attains the essence of the shaolin boxing method. I have reassessed the flowing lines and forces of the old continent, and redesigned a kata that would compliment every muscle of the body - to accommodate the body builders. 
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Kusanku's jump kick is a tell-tale sign of it's shaolin-boxing predecessor.   I would frequently add several kicks in an extended kusanku improvisations (forward and backwards).  The spinning leg sweeps tend to catch your opponents with one leg already in the air.  A higher sweep towards the knee level makes them spin faster to the ground.
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Naihanchi Method
This method consists of all closed-in type of hand-to-hand combat. It includes stepping over your opponents leg-sweeps; counter-sweep; bobbing and weaving inside; counter-strikes; close-range elbow strikes; take-downs; and check-blocking method. The practice of Naihanchi Katas condition the management of your center-of-gravity to be as low as possible.  Commonly called as the horse's stance, the naihanchi strengthens your legs, providing better maneuverability, rendering your legs ready at all predicament. The elbow strikes are much more dangerous than a punch or a kick. Directed accurately and supported properly, it can snap a vertebrae at a much slower speed than a punch or kick. In a correct angle, the elbow strike can deliver a pressure three times your weight at a low speed (more than six hundred pounds per square-inch). It is useful at very close range fighting maneuvers, breaking techniques applications, and it can stop a full speed round-house kick to a dead stop. Due to careless popularity of this technique, the actual strikes, targets, and brace supports of these methods are confidential.
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Throwing Method
There are two variances in the throwing techniques,  the vertical and the horizontal throws.  Most judo techniques utilize the vertical throws.  These require the process of elevating your opponents center of gravity (the hara region), at this point, your opponent can be spun like a propeller right on its axis (hara).

Most aikido techniques utilize the horizontal throws.  These require the process of displacing your opponent's center of gravity with your center, allowing you to throw the opponent to a centrifugal direction. 

Other protracted techniques apply the use of pressure points and joint-locks to implement the throw.  Some techniques use redirection of the opponent's center to initiate and to create a momentum for the throw.  Through practice, one can elaborate and learn to apply all the variances and their protracted exponents.